Ghostfooting

critical reading for the rude

Terence McKenna’s lost library

I was getting ready to send a friend some info on novelty theory, when I saw that Terence McKenna’s collection of rare books (slated for installation at the Esalen Institute) burned up a couple of months ago. What a library that would have been.  It apparently contained many rare books and manuscripts, McKenna’s own personal notes and writings… a copy of Cornelius Agrippa’s Three Books, a 1659 edition of Casaubon’s book on John Dee… good gracious.

And the fire started in the Quizno’s next door?  The only news articles I can find on McKenna in 2007 is a NY Times review of a book about Esalen, and an Agrentinian story on cryptozoology.  Was the entire collection destroyed?  Did any of the scraps go to archivists in other libraries?  I bet Ralph Abraham and Rupert Sheldrake would know.  And Dennis McKenna, of course.  It’s a shame…  It’s like we’ve got less and less of him left.

I guess it’s time now to go back and listen to Terence again.

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May 15, 2007 - Posted by | books, green, info sci, occult

5 Comments »

  1. Yep, some folk still live in the dark ages, friend: there are still loony people around who think book burning will prevent people from finding out stuff.(sigh) . . . unless it was an accident. Yeah. That must be it, right?

    Comment by Prof_null | May 16, 2007 | Reply

  2. […] ‘I was getting ready to send a friend some info on novelty theory, when I saw that Terence McKenna’s collection of rare books (slated for installation at the Esalen Institute) burned in February. It apparently contained many rare books and manuscripts, McKenna’s own personal notes and writings… a copy of Cornelius Agrippa’s Three Books, a 1659 edition of Casaubon’s book on John Dee . . .’(Ghostfooting) […]

    Pingback by novus.liber » Blog Archive » Terence McKenna's Lost Library | May 16, 2007 | Reply

  3. Wait, here’s more (the original report):
    Techgnosis Journal: “Terence’s brother Dennis owns an index of Terence’s collection, which will at least give us an overview of his library—sorta like a playlist without the MP3s. But even this valuable document will not replace the body of knowledge itself—a body that had become, in the weird ways of the memetic world, a kind of second body for Terence’s fabulous and fascinating mind. No budding head will ever be able to poke through this collection again, with its faintly perfumed volumes on Chinese alchemy and butterflies and hash. And the world has one fewer 1659 folio of Isaac Casaubon’s A True and Faithful Relation of what passed between Dr. John Dee and some spirits, and one fewer old-school copy of Agrippa’s Three Books of Occult Philosophy, which Terence swapped for a pound or two of yummies back in the day. The content of these books, at least, is reproducible; Terence, of course, was one-of-a-kind.”

    Comment by woody3 | May 16, 2007 | Reply

  4. […] Terence McKenna’s lost library I was getting ready to send a friend some info on novelty theory, when I saw that Terence McKenna’s collection of […] […]

    Pingback by Top Posts « WordPress.com | May 17, 2007 | Reply

  5. ah a wizard, sofia

    Comment by sofia L.S. | May 17, 2007 | Reply


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